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Wed, 2018-10-17 15:36

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Texas Folklife

Folk and Traditional Arts of Texas

Folk Arts (Visual Arts)

Most recent articles, events, video, audio and blog posts for this page:
  • Posted on Wed Sep 5, 2018

    “Patterns” is a selection of photographs by Susan Morehead featuring symmetrical designs occurring in both art and nature. The exhibition juxtaposes cactus species found primarily in the botanical garden of San Miguel de Allende, Mexico with Persian tiles witnessed in Morehead’s travels throughout Iran. Both elements contain repetitive, mathematically definable patterns such as mirror symmetry, radial symmetry, fractals and tessellation. The resulting effect raises questions about the often-intertwined relationship between artifice, natural order and mathematics.

  • Posted on Thu Aug 16, 2018

    Texas Folklife’s exhibit Yard Show showcases homes and properties transformed by their owners into uncommon personal displays with photographs by Krista Whitson, Jill Nokes and Chuy Benitez, videos and sculptural elements borrowed from selected yards as well as new installations commissioned for the exhibit. The stories in Yard Show build vivid pictures of home that is more than just real estate and property values, and offers a lens for people to view their own communities, especially those overlooked neighborhoods where forgotten public histories and private memories may contribute to a greater sense of place.

  • Posted on Thu Mar 1, 2018


    West Austin Studio Tour at Texas Folklife Gallery - featuring The Upshaws of County Line exhibit

    Texas Folklife
    1708 Houston St  
    Austin, TX 78756

  • Posted on Tue Feb 13, 2018

  • Posted on Tue Dec 19, 2017

     


    Enjoy some archival content from Texas Folklife's Apprenticeship Program:


     


     

  • Posted on Tue Dec 19, 2017


    Saturday, April 10, 2004


    Paramount Theatre, Austin

  • Posted on Tue Aug 23, 2016

    Emigrating from the region of Lusatia in what is now Northeast Germany, the Wendish people first arrived to Texas by way of Galveston in the middle of the 19th century. The Texas Wendish people still maintain a constant presence in Giddings, through Texas Wendish Heritage.

  • Posted on Mon Jan 27, 2014

    By Julie Ardery


     


    “If it looks like a duck, swims like a duck, and quacks like a duck, then it probably is a duck.”

  • Posted on Fri Oct 18, 2013

    Wuirrarika Wuewuiyaya – Huichol Art Exhibition and Sale

  • Posted on Wed Jan 21, 2009

    By Linda Ho Peché


     

    Benny Layton Tribute by Texas Folklife

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