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Mon, 2019-10-14 12:45

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Texas Folklife

Folk and Traditional Arts of Texas

Exhibits

about this program

Exhibits at the Texas Folklife Gallery and elsewhere
Texas Folklife works with artists from around the country to exhibit their works portraying the depth and breadth of Texan culture.  The exhibits are typically held at the Texas Folklife Gallery in Austin, and also in other locations around Texas.  Please contact us if you are interested in bringing one of our Exhibits to a venue near you.
Most recent articles, events, video, audio and blog posts for this page:
  • Posted on Thu Oct 3, 2013
    Exhibit reception and holiday party will be held on December 4, 2013 at 6:00 PM, at the Texas Folklife Gallery located at 1317 S. Congress Street in Austin (back entrance on Circle Street, between the Continental Club and Botticelli's Restaurant.) Live music provided by members of The Fabulous Polkasonics.
  • Posted on Sun Jan 1, 2012

    Changing Places: Ranch Gates of the Southwest


    by Douglas Manger

  • Posted on Thu Apr 7, 2011

  • Posted on Sat Aug 7, 2010

  • Posted on Mon Jul 19, 2010

    The stories in Yard Show build vivid pictures of home that is more than just real estate and property values. Yard Show offers a lens for people to view their own communities, especially those overlooked neighborhoods where forgotten public histories and private memories may contribute to a greater sense of place.

  • Posted on Thu Aug 12, 1999

    Texas Folklife's program 1999 "Quilts of Color: Three Generations of Quilters" featured exhibitions, demonstrations, lectures, and workshops about the tradition of quilting among sisters Katie Mae Tatum, Gladys Henry and Henry's daughter Lavene Brackens and granddaughter Sherry Byrd.  This family of quilters has been based out of Fairfield, Texas for the last five generations, since the end of the Civil War.

  • Posted on Mon Dec 17, 2018

    Texas Folklife's program Apprenticeships in the Folk Arts brings together master artists and apprentices in collaborations that encourage each to preserve and develop their traditions. The exhibition Pass It On celebrates the lives, talents and commitment of Texas' master folk artists and the apprentices who have worked with them. In the faces of these amsters we see the satisfaction they have gained from their lifetime involvements with particular traditional arts. We see as well the sacrifices some have has to make as members of certain folk groups. Finally, they wear in their expression sthe hope that they are handing on a precious legacy to new minds, hands, feet and voices who will in their turn pass it on for years to come.

  • Posted on Wed Oct 10, 2018

    Accordion Kings & Queens is an annual Texas Folklife showcase of the amazing musical diversity of Texas accordion styles, featuring legends of conjunto, polka, country western, zydeco, Cajun and more. The annual event celebrates the cultural diversity of Texas by bringing communities together for an evening of dancing and roots music played on the accordion, "the national instrument of Texas," drawing a capacity crowd of six thousand to Houston's Miller Outdoor Theatre every year.

  • Posted on Mon Sep 10, 2018

    The ranch gate is one of the most recognizable cultural artifacts of Americana, representing the people and landscapes, history and folklore of the American West. As ranches are consolidated and ranching becomes industrialized, the number of ranches is dwindling and the handcrafted gate is becoming a thing of the past. This exhibit, based on the book “Ranch Gates of the Southwest: Manifestation of Individualism” by Daniel M Olsen and Henk Van Assen, features selected photographs of custom ranch gates from across the Southwest that highlight the folklore and lifestyles of ranchers from this region and explore the design, landscape, and cultural history of ranching in the Southwest.

  • Posted on Mon Sep 10, 2018

    “The El Paso/Juarez border community is the largest border community in the world and is a one-of-a-kind, distinctly vibrant community. For decades we have been haunted by negative media coverage, whether it be about illegal immigration or serial killings, and although these events cannot be denied, they only represent a minute percentage of life on the border…After finding my place as a photographer, I then decided to communicate through photography the same stories of home I had been telling for years. Each photograph in this series is filled with personal significance and shows locations and experiences that are a part of my life and the lives of other born-and-raised El Pasoans and Juarenses.” – Chuy Benitez, photographer

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